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Nagaland

Valentine’s Day: Say it with roses

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By Mirror Desk Updated: Feb 14, 2019 1:44 am
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Technology has not taken away the tradition of giving roses to loved ones

Ladies sell flowers and other Valentine’s Day-related items in Dimapur, on Feb. 13. (EM Images)

Eastern Mirror Desk
Dimapur, Feb. 13: Love is in the air and commercial complexes have been painted red as one of the most-awaited days of the year — Valentine’s Day – is here.

Valentine’s Day, which falls on February 14 every year, may have its root in Christianity as it marks the feast of St Valentine, but it has turned into a global event over the years with people cutting across religions and regions celebrating the day to express their love to their special ones.

Many citizens of Nagaland’s commercial hub Dimapur too are joining millions of people across the world in celebrating Valentine’s Day. Some argue that “every day is Valentine’s Day” for people in love but even those who don’t celebrate the occasion know that February 14 is a red-letter day for thousands.

“There is something about Feb. 14 even if I celebrate or not. The atmosphere and the hype make the day significant and although I don’t celebrate I feel the day is like a festival”, a customer who was purchasing goodies (not for Valentine’s Day) told Eastern Mirror.

You may call it romantic, or just an expression of love, but Valentine’s Day surely makes both the young and old shed shyness and follows the call of the heart. If you’re in a relationship, you could be possibly contemplating what kind of gift you would give your lover.

Dimapur city is adorned with images of cupid, hearts, and roses. Shops are trying to attract customers with heart-shaped balloons and discount offers but Cupid, the god of love, may witness a rude shock this year with Valentine’s Day celebration changing every year.

A customer buying rose from a florist in Dimapur on Feb. 13, a day ahead of Valentine’s Day. (EM Images/Caisii Mao)

Most people may relate Valentine’s Day with sentimental or feisty cards, boxes of sweets or a bouquet of flower, but the occasion transformed over the years with people going beyond “just roses, chocolates and cards.” Today’s generation has a lot more choices when it comes to gifts for that special someone.

While the once-treasured exchange of cards is no longer in trend and gift shops no longer sell it, roses are still in demand for the occasion. Florists are happy that technology or the available option in the market has not taken away the tradition of giving roses to loved ones.

A florist said that it was her fifth year of selling roses from her garden on Valentine’s Day.

“We (Nagas) do not have the tradition of giving roses or flower but on Valentine’s Day people, both the young and old do not mind buying them. It is also a good time for business,” she said. She added that sales increase on Feb. 14 though the stall was opened a day ahead of the occasion.

 

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By Mirror Desk Updated: Feb 14, 2019 1:44:55 am