Feature – Eastern Mirror https://easternmirrornagaland.com The latest and breaking news from Nagaland, northeast India, India and the world. Current affairs and news of politics from around the world, latest updates on business news, sports, arts and entertainment Sat, 16 May 2020 10:59:51 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://easternmirrornagaland.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/cropped-FavIcon-32x32.png Feature – Eastern Mirror https://easternmirrornagaland.com 32 32 Board game Ludo makes a comeback among youths during lockdown https://easternmirrornagaland.com/board-game-ludo-makes-a-comeback-among-youths-during-lockdown/ Sat, 09 May 2020 15:33:16 +0000 https://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=311676 Our ReporterDimapur, May 9 (EMN): At a time where everyone is at home not having much to do besides the usual, you may hear shouts and slangs out of the blue that may make people think there’s a fight taking place right at the neighbours’ place. However, don’t be alarmed—chances are that the reactions are being caused by a mobile game, Ludo. The game is slowly becoming part of life for citizens especially during the lockdown. The game has been trending far and wide in Nagaland. Eastern Mirror spoke to some people about the game, now available as a mobile game, and their experience in playing it. ‘It’s the game of the season,’ explains Atoholi while also saying that she now plays the game for three to four hours daily.   At home in Mumbai for the past few months along with a friend, she said Ludo has become somewhat of a mandatory thing for them to play, and they end up playing the game for hours. Another Naga youth, J Manlem, also said that she gets a kick whenever she knocks down her game opponents. ‘However, if you lose, the anger and the irritation is of a different level,’...

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Our Reporter
Dimapur, May 9 (EMN): At a time where everyone is at home not having much to do besides the usual, you may hear shouts and slangs out of the blue that may make people think there’s a fight taking place right at the neighbours’ place.

However, don’t be alarmed—chances are that the reactions are being caused by a mobile game, Ludo. The game is slowly becoming part of life for citizens especially during the lockdown. The game has been trending far and wide in Nagaland.

Eastern Mirror spoke to some people about the game, now available as a mobile game, and their experience in playing it.

‘It’s the game of the season,’ explains Atoholi while also saying that she now plays the game for three to four hours daily.  

At home in Mumbai for the past few months along with a friend, she said Ludo has become somewhat of a mandatory thing for them to play, and they end up playing the game for hours.

Another Naga youth, J Manlem, also said that she gets a kick whenever she knocks down her game opponents.

‘However, if you lose, the anger and the irritation is of a different level,’ Manlem joked as she explained why she cannot end the game on a losing streak.

Similarly for Nikito Yeptho, Ludo has been bearing on his brains since he started playing the game.

‘The thing is, I have never won a Ludo game in my whole life, not even once. And that’s why I’ll keep on playing the game to the point where I win even one match,’ swears Yeptho. He described how much he disliked losing but couldn’t let go off the game either.

Currently staying with his three sisters in Dimapur, he said Ludo has become intense for him and his sisters that they now ‘beat up’ or pull each other’s hair every time a token (a piece a player owns) gets killed.

Yeptho expressed happiness that the game gives them an opportunity to engage with one another and spend the lockdown days together without actually having to worry or bother much about other issues.   

According to another Naga youth, Vilina Kits, Ludo is by far the easiest game that anyone irrespective of age or education can play as the rules of the game can be easily understood.

Nonetheless, it does not stop there. She joked that the game helps her maintain emotional poise as she was ‘tired of making tea and doing other chores for her family members as a punishment’ whenever she loses a game.

‘Our family plays the game together once or twice a day, and whosoever loses will be made to work according to what the three other player wishes,’ said Kits as she continued laughing while explaining about the work she must do as punishment whenever she loses a game.

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Economic Survey 2020 Presents Thalinomic Success https://easternmirrornagaland.com/economic-survey-2020-presents-thalinomic-success/ Sat, 01 Feb 2020 17:14:49 +0000 https://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=291200 Mithilesh Kumar Sinha The Economic Survey is a report the government presents on the state of the economy in the past year, the key challenges it anticipates, and their possible solutions. The Economic Survey is a crucial document as it provides a detailed, official version of the government’s take on the country’s economic condition. It can also be used to highlight some key concerns or areas of focus — for example, in 2018, the survey presented by the then CEA Arvind Subramanian was pink in colour, to stress on gender equality. The release of India’s Economic Survey for the year was well-timed. Since it came just before lunch, few could resist going straight to Chapter 11. This is not about bankruptcy, but “Thalinomics”, described as “the economics of a plate of food in India”. The idea is to create a special basket—a thali—of food items in some proportion to trace how expensive the basic Indian diet has become for the common man over the years. For this, it takes price data for imaginary vegetarian and non-vegetarian meals from 2006-07 to October 2019. In keeping with recent tradition, the latest Economic Survey comes in two volumes. The second volume is an...

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Mithilesh Kumar Sinha

The Economic Survey is a report the government presents on the state of the economy in the past year, the key challenges it anticipates, and their possible solutions.

The Economic Survey is a crucial document as it provides a detailed, official version of the government’s take on the country’s economic condition.

It can also be used to highlight some key concerns or areas of focus — for example, in 2018, the survey presented by the then CEA Arvind Subramanian was pink in colour, to stress on gender equality.

The release of India’s Economic Survey for the year was well-timed. Since it came just before lunch, few could resist going straight to Chapter 11. This is not about bankruptcy, but “Thalinomics”, described as “the economics of a plate of food in India”. The idea is to create a special basket—a thali—of food items in some proportion to trace how expensive the basic Indian diet has become for the common man over the years. For this, it takes price data for imaginary vegetarian and non-vegetarian meals from 2006-07 to October 2019.

In keeping with recent tradition, the latest Economic Survey comes in two volumes. The second volume is an update on the performance of various sectors, while the first delve into a few selected topics ranging from the ‘economics of a thali’ to the importance of systemic trust. The survey, a detailed report card on the economic performance, was tabled by Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman after President Ram Nath Kovind said the government is committed to make India a five trillion dollar economy by 2025. The government has estimated GDP expansion at 5 per cent for the current financial year ending on March 31. In the July to September quarter, economic growth slipped to 4.5 per cent.

Optimistic projection Economic Survey 2019-20 is aimed at infusing cautious hope in speculation about the state of the Indian economy and restoring trust. The Survey debunks the theory that free trade agreements (FTA) have not worked in India’s favour and resulted in a worsening of the trade deficit. Economic Survey 2020 talks of an “Assemble in India for the world” programme that could be integrated with the Make in India plan to create jobs—40 million well-paying ones by 2025. The Survey advocates that at a time when the China-US trade war is raging, India should step in to take benefit of the opportunity in export manufacturing and create jobs for its citizens.

Survey says India must focus on a group of industries, referred to as “network products”, where “production processes are globally fragmented and controlled by leading Multi-National Enterprises within their “producer-driven” global production networks. Examples of network products include computers, electronic and electrical equipment, telecommunication equipment, road vehicles etc”.

Economic Survey advocates 10 new ideas that benefit markets as well as the economy.

Mithilesh Kumar Sinha is a Finance Officer at Nagaland University, Lumami.

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FAQ’s on Novel Corona Virus (2019-nCoV) https://easternmirrornagaland.com/faqs-on-novel-corona-virus-2019-ncov/ Wed, 29 Jan 2020 17:30:42 +0000 https://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=290708 Q. What is 2019 Novel Coronavirus? A. 2019 Novel Coronavirus, or 2019-nCov, is a new virus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. It is named novel as it has not been previously identified and new. Q: what is the source of 2019 Novel Corona virus? A: At present exact source of infection of 2019 Novel Corona Virus has not been identified. Coronaviruses are a large family of Viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals. Initially, many of the patients in the outbreak in Wuhan, China reportedly had some link to large seafood and animal market, suggesting the virus likely emerged from an animal source. Q: What are the initial symptoms of Novel Coronavirus 2019? A: Current symptoms reported for patients with 2019-nCoV include acute onset of fever, cough and difficulty in breathing. Q: How does the Virus spread? A: The specific modes of transmission of the Virus are not clear yet since it is a novel virus. This virus probably originally emerged from an animal source but now seems to be spreading from person to person. It’s not clear yet how easily 2019-nCoV spreads from person to person. It is thought to have happened...

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Q. What is 2019 Novel Coronavirus?
A.
2019 Novel Coronavirus, or 2019-nCov, is a new virus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. It is named novel as it has not been previously identified and new.

Q: what is the source of 2019 Novel Corona virus?
A:
At present exact source of infection of 2019 Novel Corona Virus has not been identified. Coronaviruses are a large family of Viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals. Initially, many of the patients in the outbreak in Wuhan, China reportedly had some link to large seafood and animal market, suggesting the virus likely emerged from an animal source.

Q: What are the initial symptoms of Novel Coronavirus 2019?
A:
Current symptoms reported for patients with 2019-nCoV include acute onset of fever, cough and difficulty in breathing.

Q: How does the Virus spread?
A:
The specific modes of transmission of the Virus are not clear yet since it is a novel virus. This virus probably originally emerged from an animal source but now seems to be spreading from person to person. It’s not clear yet how easily 2019-nCoV spreads from person to person. It is thought to have happened mainly when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza and other respiratory pathogens spread.

Q: Has anyone in India got the infection?
A:
As of 29th Jan.2020, No. Thus far, there is no report of any laboratory confirmed case 2019-nCoV. Suspected cases are being identified through surveillance in India.

Q: What is GoI doing about 2019-nCoV?
A:
A 24*7 helpline has been set up by the GoI at NCDC, New Delhi to answer all queries regarding the disease. The GoI is closely monitoring the situation and has ascertained the level of preparedness in every State of India. As this is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation the GoI will continue to provide updated information as it becomes available.

Q: How can I help protect myself?
A:
There is currently no vaccine to prevent 2019-nCoV infection. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to this virus.

•             All non-essential travel to China or affected Countries to be avoided.
•             Observe good personal hygiene.
•             Practise frequent hand washing with soap.
•             Cover your mouth when coughing and sneezing.

Q: What should I do if I had close contact with someone who is a confirmed case of 2019-nCoV?
A:
Self monitor your health starting from the day of last contact with such a case and continue for 28 days. Watch for the development of acute onset of signs and symptoms:

•             Fever
•             Cough
•             Shortness of breath or difficulty in breathing

If you observe any of the above symptoms visit the nearest health facility for further advice and treatment. Further you must furnish the details of exposure patient to your health care worker.

Q: Is it safe to travel to Wuhan, China or other Countries where 2019-nCoV 2019 cases have occurred?
A:
All non-essential travel to China is to be avoided.

If the travel is unavoidable- At all times follow the simple public health measures.

•             Observe good personal hygiene.
•             Monitor your health closely.
•             Seek medical attention promptly if you feel sick.
•             If you feel sick during travel, inform airline crew about your illness and seek mask from the airline crew.

For further details kindly check travel advisory issued by MoHFW, GoI available on website (www.mohfw.gov.in)

Q: Is there a Vaccine to get protection from 2019 novel Corona Virus?
A:
Currently, there is no vaccine available to protect against 2019-novel Corona Virus.

Q: What are the treatments?
A:
There is no specific antiviral treatment available for 2019- novel Corona Virus infection. People infected with 2019- novel Corona Virus should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. However, you may receive antibiotics since bacterial co-infection is possible.

Q: Should I be tested for 2019- novel Corona Virus?
A:
If you develop acute onset of fever and symptoms of respiratory illness, such as cough or shortness of breath, you should visit nearest health facility and the doctor’s will decide if you need to be tested for 2019- novel Corona Virus depending upon your history of travel to China/ affected Countries or contact with any suspected/ lab confirmed case.

*The list of affected Countries is available on WHO website(www.who.int) and would be updated time to time.

Additional Information:-
Any persons with travel history to China or the affected countries in the last 14 days may self-declare or report to the numbers provided and also contact for more information.

1.            7005415243
2.            9856071745
3.            7005539653
4.            Email: nlssu.idsp@nic.in

Dr.Vizolie Z Suokhrie
Principal Director
Directorate of Health & Family Welfare
Nagaland : Kohima

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Bushfires: can ecosystems recover from such dramatic losses of biodiversity? https://easternmirrornagaland.com/bushfires-can-ecosystems-recover-from-such-dramatic-losses-of-biodiversity/ Fri, 17 Jan 2020 14:39:19 +0000 https://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=288584 Darren Evans, Newcastle University The sheer scale and intensity of the Australian bushfire crisis have led to apocalyptic scenes making the front pages of newspapers the world over. An estimated 10 million hectares (100,000 sq km) of land have burned since 1 July 2019. At least 28 people have died. And over a billion animals are estimated to have been killed to date. Of course, the actual toll will be much higher if major animal groups, such as insects, are included in these estimates. The impacts of climate change – in particular, the consequences of the increasing frequency of extreme weather events on all life should be abundantly clear. People finally seem to be taking this seriously, but there is an undercurrent of opinion about the “naturalness” of wildfires. Some are still questioning the role of climate change in driving the Australian bushfires. It is true that wildfires naturally occur in many parts of the world, and benefit plants and animals in ecosystems that have been uniquely shaped by fire over evolutionary time. And people have been using fire to manage ecosystems for thousands of years. We could learn a thing or two from Aboriginal people and the techniques they...

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Darren Evans, Newcastle University

The sheer scale and intensity of the Australian bushfire crisis have led to apocalyptic scenes making the front pages of newspapers the world over. An estimated 10 million hectares (100,000 sq km) of land have burned since 1 July 2019. At least 28 people have died. And over a billion animals are estimated to have been killed to date. Of course, the actual toll will be much higher if major animal groups, such as insects, are included in these estimates.

The impacts of climate change – in particular, the consequences of the increasing frequency of extreme weather events on all life should be abundantly clear. People finally seem to be taking this seriously, but there is an undercurrent of opinion about the “naturalness” of wildfires. Some are still questioning the role of climate change in driving the Australian bushfires.

It is true that wildfires naturally occur in many parts of the world, and benefit plants and animals in ecosystems that have been uniquely shaped by fire over evolutionary time. And people have been using fire to manage ecosystems for thousands of years. We could learn a thing or two from Aboriginal people and the techniques they have traditionally used to prevent bushfires.

But make no mistake, the scientific evidence shows that human-caused climate change is a key driver of the rapid and unprecedented increases in wildfire activity. What is particularly worrying is the extent to which this is eroding the resilience of ecosystems across wide regions. Yes, it is plausible to expect most plants and animals that have adapted to fire will recover. But the ecological costs of huge, repetitive, high-severity wildfires on ecosystems could be colossal.

Out of control

And it’s unclear how much the natural world can tolerate such dramatic disturbance. Wildfires are increasing in severity around the world. The Australian bushfires are larger than some of the deadliest recorded. Incidences are also increasing in ecosystems where wildfires are uncommon, such as the UK uplands. Not to mention the widespread deliberate burning of areas of high conservation value for agriculture, as has been recently reported in large parts of the Brazilian Amazon for beef production and in Indonesia for palm oil.

Unsurprisingly, given the shocking numbers of animals that must have perished as a result of these wildfires, many are questioning whether burned ecosystems can recover from such dramatic losses of biodiversity. In Australia, for example, some estimate that the fires could drive more than 700 insect species to extinction.

The world’s biodiversity is already severely struggling – we are in the midst of what scientists describe as the sixth mass extinction. A recent report has highlighted that about a quarter of assessed species are threatened with extinction. Australia already has the highest rate of mammal loss for any region in the world, signalling the fragility of existing ecosystems that might struggle to function in a warming, fire prone world.

Fears for familiar and charismatic animals affected by the bushfires, such as koala, have been expressed by conservationists. The outlook for already critically endangered species, such as the regent honeyeater and western ground parrot, meanwhile, is uncertain. But to establish the true ecological costs of wildfires it is important to consider biodiversity in terms of networks, not particular species or numbers of animals.

All species are embedded in complex networks of interactions where they are directly and indirectly dependent on each other. A food web is a good example of such networks. The simultaneous loss of such large numbers of plants and animals could have cascading impacts on the ways species interact – and hence the ability of ecosystems to bounce back and properly function following high-severity wildfires.

A fragile system

And so it’s key that we consider biodiversity loss due to wildfires in terms of entire networks of interacting organisms, including humans, rather than simply one or two charismatic animals. I have studied and recently published research about the loss of plants and animals due to wildfires in Portugal, using new methods in ecology that can examine the resilience of ecosystems to species extinctions. My team found that networks of interacting plants and animals at burned sites became fragile and more prone to species extinctions.

Our study looked at the impacts of a large wildfire in 2012 on one of the many ecological interactions that keep ecosystems healthy – insect pollination. We examined the responses of moths, which are important but often overlooked pollinators, to wildfire by comparing those we caught in burned and neighbouring unburned areas.

The hummingbird hawk moth. Research in Portugal is revealing the importance of moths as pollinators. Claudio306/Shutterstock.com

By collecting, counting and identifying the thousands of pollen grains they were carrying, we were able to decipher the plant-insect network of interacting species. In this way, it was possible to examine not only the responses of the plants and animals to wildfire, but crucially the impacts on pollination processes.

We then used these networks to model the resilience of the ecosystem more generally. We found that burned areas had significantly more abundant flowers (due to a flush of plants whose seeds and roots survived in the soil) but less abundant and species‐rich moths. The total amount of pollen being transported by the moths in burned areas was just 20% of that at unburned areas.

Our analysis revealed important differences in the way these species interacted as a result of the wildfire. Although the study was only a snapshot in time, we were able to show that plant-insect communities at burned sites were less able to resist the effects of any further disturbances without suffering species extinctions.

And so as people start rebuilding their homes, livelihoods and communities in Australia following the devastating bushfires, it is crucial that governments and land managers around the world take sensible decisions that will build resilience into ecosystems. To do this, ecological interaction networks need to be considered, rather than specific species. Cutting-edge network approaches that examine the complex ways in which entire communities of species interact can and should help with this.

Over 45 years ago, the American evolutionary ecologist and conservationist Dan Janzen wrote: “There is a much more insidious kind of extinction: the extinction of ecological interactions.” We should all be concerned not just about the loss of animals, but about the unravelling of species interactions within ecosystems on which we all depend for our survival.


Click here to subscribe to our climate action newsletter. Climate change is inevitable. Our response to it isn’t.

Darren Evans, Reader in Ecology and Conservation, Newcastle University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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For 41 Days, Only Silence Reigns in these Manali Villages https://easternmirrornagaland.com/for-41-days-only-silence-reigns-in-these-manali-villages/ Thu, 16 Jan 2020 18:46:44 +0000 https://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=288495 By Vishal Gulati | IANSIt’s silence for the gods in 10 villages dotting the outskirts of the picturesque hill resort of Manali, currently marooned under a blanket of snow. For 41 days, silence will reign in these villages as locals have switched on the mute button, silencing their radios and even mobile ringtones. This ‘do not disturb’ policy has been religiously followed for long in Goshal, Shanag and eight other tiny hamlets — with a population less than 10,000 — in Kullu district, some 250 km from the state capital. The villagers also don’t allow honking on village roads, or visitors to talk loudly. The silence, that begins every year on Makar Sankranti (January 14/15), continues till the end of the month of ‘Magh’. This year, it will end on February 24. During this period, the locals also avoid listening to music, watching television or doing the kind of household chores and work in the fields that make noise. The reason behind the practice is the belief that the Gods — Gautam Rishi, Ved Vyas Rishi and Kanchan Nag, a serpent deity — whose temple is located in Goshal village, four kilometres from upper Manali, are meditating. Legend has it...

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Tourists visit the snow-laden Solang valley in Manali, Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020. (PTI Photo)

By Vishal Gulati | IANS
It’s silence for the gods in 10 villages dotting the outskirts of the picturesque hill resort of Manali, currently marooned under a blanket of snow.

For 41 days, silence will reign in these villages as locals have switched on the mute button, silencing their radios and even mobile ringtones.

This ‘do not disturb’ policy has been religiously followed for long in Goshal, Shanag and eight other tiny hamlets — with a population less than 10,000 — in Kullu district, some 250 km from the state capital.

The villagers also don’t allow honking on village roads, or visitors to talk loudly.

The silence, that begins every year on Makar Sankranti (January 14/15), continues till the end of the month of ‘Magh’. This year, it will end on February 24.

During this period, the locals also avoid listening to music, watching television or doing the kind of household chores and work in the fields that make noise.

The reason behind the practice is the belief that the Gods — Gautam Rishi, Ved Vyas Rishi and Kanchan Nag, a serpent deity — whose temple is located in Goshal village, four kilometres from upper Manali, are meditating.

Legend has it that the chief deity, Gautam Rishi, meditated where the temple is situated.

Every year on Makar Sankranti, the centuries-old temple, exemplifying typical hill architecture, closes down.

It will be reopened when the deities are supposed to return from their winter sojourn. During this period, no religious ceremony is performed in the temple, priest Hari Singh told IANS here.

As per tradition, the locals will start their routine activities only when the deities return to the temple and it reopens.

“Every year, on the first day of ‘Magh’, the temple closes after performing rituals, based on the belief that the deities journey to heaven to meditate. They will now return to earth on the ‘Phalguna’ month that falls on February 24,” said Hari Singh.

During the deities’ sojourn away, no one is allowed to make noise which, it is believed, would disturb their meditation and can, therefore, earn their wrath.

Octogenarian local Tikkam Chand, who is settled in Burua village, said that even their ancestors were following this practice of observing silence during the assembly of the deities in heaven.

He said all agricultural works and anything that makes noise are stopped during this period.

Instead, this period witnesses a spurt in other activities in these villages.

The womenfolk gather at one place and devote most of their time stitching clothes and knitting woolens without chatting or listening to music.

“During this period when the entire area is marooned in snow, we prefer to spend most of the time inside our homes. The young family members these days prefer to move to nearby towns like Kullu and Manali for earning livelihood,” Sarita Devi, a mother of two, said.

“Now, only when the ‘devtas’ return to earth and the temple is reopened, will we start our agricultural work,” she added.

Manali and nearby areas are one of state’s major apple growing regions, with more than 90 per cent of the produce being destined for the domestic market.

The apple crop is currently in a dormant state and flowering will begin by end-March.

In line with tradition, the Gautam Rishi temple is closed after spreading earth inside and planting a seed in a pot full of soil kept close to the idol. Locals believe that if a flower has surfaced on the soil when the temple reopens, it is an augury of happiness for villagers in the coming year.

Instead, the appearance of charcoal signifies that the village is in store for some fire-related tragedy. Grain indicates a good harvest.

“When the temple is reopened, a prediction will be made on the basis of the sacred mud spread inside the temple,” the priest said.

The other villages where this tradition is followed include Solang, known for its ski slopes, Kothi, Majhach and Palchan in the Ujhi Valley.

The picturesque Kullu Valley is famous for its ancient shamanistic traditions that govern the lives of the ethnic communities. As per a study conducted, there are the 534 gods and goddesses in the Kullu Valley who are said to be “alive”.

According to “A reference book on Kullu Devtas” compiled by the local administration, the gods “live” among the people. They have families and relatives living among the local people who join them in the celebrations.

Vishal Gulati can be contacted at vishal.g@ians.in

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Hornbill Festival: Inside Naga morungs — part I https://easternmirrornagaland.com/hornbill-festival-inside-naga-morungs-part-i/ Thu, 05 Dec 2019 19:31:38 +0000 https://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=285951 Our Correspondent Kisama, Dec. 5 (EMN): Despite, and even perhaps because, of all the downbeat sentiments surrounding the annual event, Hornbill Festival has managed to survive and stand its ground—twenty years on the trot surely must count for something. As has been the case for almost two decades, this year’s edition of Hornbill Festival at Kisama has drawn visitors from all corners of the globe. The unwritten rule dictates that all visitors must enter the numerous morungs, and interact with its occupants. Playing the role of visitors, Eastern Mirror on Thursday sought audience with the occupants of different Naga morungs—if only to share the experience with our readers. Lotha Ntsemo, leader of a Lotha cultural troupe, said that there were 45 ‘participants’ —22 girls and 23 boys, village elders and youths—participating in the festival. He also informed that this is the third time the club members were performing at the Hornbill Festival (2010, 2015 and 2019). They have prepared 10 cultural items for the festival, for which they have been practising for over a month, he said. Ao Forty-five participants, consisting of 15 girls and 30 boys, from Dibuia village in Mokokchung are there to perform, according to the troupe...

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Sentinel: A Zeliang tribesman on the fifth day of Hornbill Festival 2019 at Naga Heritage Village Kisama in Kohima on Thursday. EM Images/ Caisii Mao

Our Correspondent

Kisama, Dec. 5 (EMN): Despite, and even perhaps because, of all the downbeat sentiments surrounding the annual event, Hornbill Festival has managed to survive and stand its ground—twenty years on the trot surely must count for something.

As has been the case for almost two decades, this year’s edition of Hornbill Festival at Kisama has drawn visitors from all corners of the globe. The unwritten rule dictates that all visitors must enter the numerous morungs, and interact with its occupants.

Playing the role of visitors, Eastern Mirror on Thursday sought audience with the occupants of different Naga morungs—if only to share the experience with our readers.

Lotha

Ntsemo, leader of a Lotha cultural troupe, said that there were 45 ‘participants’ —22 girls and 23 boys, village elders and youths—participating in the festival. He also informed that this is the third time the club members were performing at the Hornbill Festival (2010, 2015 and 2019). They have prepared 10 cultural items for the festival, for which they have been practising for over a month, he said.

Ao

Forty-five participants, consisting of 15 girls and 30 boys, from Dibuia village in Mokokchung are there to perform, according to the troupe leader, Longrichang. He informed that they have prepared 10 cultural items.

Yanger Ao, the person “in charge” of Ao morung, said that the food item that had attracted most tourists was smoked pork cooked in anishi. All the food items, he said, have been transported from Mokokchung district.

Chang

Fifteen women and 30 men from Woshu village of Chang tribe, have come to perform in the festival, informed their troupe leader, Chingmak. He admitted that they did not practice much as the performers already knew the moves they have learnt since childhood from their forefathers. He said that they have prepared 10 cultural performances. They travelled for more than 10 hours to participate in the festival, he said.

Khiamniungan

New Pangsha village represented the Khiamniungan tribe to perform at the Hornbill Festival— consisting of 22 women and 15 village guards, where three of them were said to be students. For them, this is their first participation—a result of practice for more than four months.

According to the troupe leader, they had travelled for 350 km by bus to reach Kisama, and due to the long-distance, it was difficult to bring the materials for their performance. He also mentioned that the cold weather was posing problems for members of his troupe.

Konyak

Seven villages from the Mopong unit of Konyak tribe came to participate—where 41 women, all confirmed to be married, travelled around 500 km to reach Kisama. Cultural secretary of the union, Eshang told Eastern Mirror that they have been practising for more than four months. She also informed that all the participants were married and have children, and even breastfeeding-mothers were taking part in the festivities.

She shared that since they were from different villages, they would travel and gather at a village to practice every day for around 3 hours and then go back to their own villages. “We would wake up at 3 am in the morning, cook food for the family, do some household chores and then go for practice and we have been doing that for around 4 months,” she said. She also informed that 45 of them came in a bus.

Konyak Students Union, Kohima has been charged with looking after the Konyak morung at Kisama for this festival. They informed that they have been preparing for 2 weeks since the festival started.

Yimchungrü

Dhirenmew, troupe in-charge, informed that 41 participants consisting of four girls and village elders from Phuvkiu village of Yimchungrü tribe have come to take part in the festival. They prepared 10 cultural items where nine were selected to perform in the arena. He also informed that they practised only for around a week before coming to Kisama as they already know the cultural songs and dances. They travelled nearly 300 km to reach Kisama.

Phom

Pongo village is representing the Phom tribe at the Hornbill Festival this year. L Chingpom, troupe leader, informed that 45 participants including seven girls came to take part in the event. Fifteen students were in the cultural troupe. They also travelled around 15 hours to reach Kisama.

He mentioned that searching for cultural dresses and accessories, travelling long-distance and coordinating with the troupe were some of the challenges faced. Morung in-charge, Tongpa also informed that their special food ‘Anphet’ was a prime attraction among tourists.

Garo

Darogapathar village performed at the Hornbill Festival representing the Garo tribe–16 girls and 29 boys. College-going students have requested leave to perform in the festival, said Cliff Sangma, the troupe leader. He also informed that they have been practising for four months, and they have prepared 10 cultural items for the festival.  They used to practise for three hours every day in the evening after the students finished their classes.

Pochury

Khumiasü village of Pochury Naga is representing their tribe, said Shietsütho, the troupe leader. He also informed that 40 participants, all women along with 5 village leaders, had travelled for around 10 hours to reach Kisama. They would practice whenever they were free, and the same troupe also performed at Madhya Pradesh, he stated.

Zeliang

“The ten cultural items prepared for the Hornbill Festival did not need much practise as we know it automatically. We are prepared in such a way that we can perform any kind of cultural dance and song, whenever called for, irrespective of age and gender,” according to Sibeule Hegui, in-charge of the Zeliang morung.

When it comes to the treatment of women, she said that they have traditionally maintained restrictions, particularly for married female. For folk dance, she said, “married women are not allowed”.

In order to differentiate themselves from others during traditional festivities, married women wear plain traditional dress, instead of decorated ones. However, there are no such restrictions for men. A total of 45 participants with 12 girls and 33 male (five elderly men) are representing the community as a cultural troupe.

Angami

The popular local brew called ‘Zutho’ prepared at the Angami morung seemed to be running short for first few days, as visitors kept frequenting the morung endlessly. For any casual observer, it was clear that the visitors had discovered an unusual affinity towards the Angami morung.

The local brew is allowed by the state government in Kisama, as part of Naga tradition. However, some morungs restricted themselves from selling local brews or any alcohol products.

According to Zakie Khate, as much 4,000 litres of Zutho were consumed before 7 pm on the first day. The same amount was served on the second day. On December 3, he said that 6000 litres of Zutho was provided, and that too ran out of stock.

The Khonoma village cultural troupe is representing Angami community this year.

Chakhesang

A cultural troupe from Kutsapo village from Phek district is representing the Chakhesang community— after practising ten varieties of ancestral traditions for nearly three months, to perform at the annual extravaganza.

One of the interesting features about Kütsapo village is that they generally converse with one another in Sumi dialect, as it is their mother tongue. However, they are also equally well-versed at other Chakhesang dialects.

Group leader Esther Rhakho shared that the distance of travelling for over eight hours was their main challenge. The cultural troupe is mainly comprised of the village’s youth, who are visiting the capital for the first time, she added.

Of all the dishes that Chakhesang morung provides, ‘piglets dish’ and galho (veg-stew) are the major attraction to many visitors, she said.

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Finding her passion and beauty in needlework https://easternmirrornagaland.com/finding-her-passion-and-beauty-in-needlework/ Sun, 27 Oct 2019 17:16:58 +0000 https://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=279850 Dimapur, Oct. 27 (EMN): Unlike cross-stitch, which follows a basic X stitch pattern, ’embroidery’ gives you the freedom to express and explore your creativity. Vesolu Luruo, an embroidery artist based in Hyderabad, shared this sentiment to Eastern Mirror. Famed for ‘the lady in her Naga traditional attire with a Naga basket’ embroidery work, Luruo, who is a mother of two boys, said that she started embroidery in 2014. “From the first time I tried it till now, I have been completely absorbed and fascinated at how one can create or design using just few simple basic stitches. It is a slow, progressing work, which involves time and patience; but that is what I have come to love about this art. It has allowed me to slow down and helped find beauty in things around me,” she shared. Luruo said: “I was praying for something to do at home after marriage, and before the boys came along. It all started with an impromptu trip to this tiny thread shop in the neighbourhood. With a big needle and sewing thread in my hands, I started exploring video tutorials on YouTube which was followed by a lot of ‘pinning’ on Pinterest. I remember...

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One of the embroidery works of Vesolu Luruo.

Dimapur, Oct. 27 (EMN): Unlike cross-stitch, which follows a basic X stitch pattern, ’embroidery’ gives you the freedom to express and explore your creativity. Vesolu Luruo, an embroidery artist based in Hyderabad, shared this sentiment to Eastern Mirror.

Famed for ‘the lady in her Naga traditional attire with a Naga basket’ embroidery work, Luruo, who is a mother of two boys, said that she started embroidery in 2014.

“From the first time I tried it till now, I have been completely absorbed and fascinated at how one can create or design using just few simple basic stitches. It is a slow, progressing work, which involves time and patience; but that is what I have come to love about this art. It has allowed me to slow down and helped find beauty in things around me,” she shared.

Luruo said: “I was praying for something to do at home after marriage, and before the boys came along. It all started with an impromptu trip to this tiny thread shop in the neighbourhood. With a big needle and sewing thread in my hands, I started exploring video tutorials on YouTube which was followed by a lot of ‘pinning’ on Pinterest. I remember practising on our cushion covers to begin with. In fact, my first few sales were made through cushion covers.”

According to Luruo, her passion for embroidery comes from her mother. “She always wanted us, the daughters, to learn the art of cross-stitching, knitting and sewing. I must have been in fourth standard when she first taught me how to cross-stitch, a simple counted pattern on my handkerchief. However, I gave up after finishing two more pieces. I shifted to knitting instead, and actually knitted quite a few,” she recounted.

“Embroidery is something I picked up after I got married, but my love for yarns, threads and needlework is clearly something I acquired from my mother,” she added.

Luruo, who has had no formal training, said that ‘embroidery continues to rise’ and has received much enthusiasm from various artists.

On the recognition she has received on social media, she said: “I must confess that I am enjoying the appreciation people have showered on my works recently. Even friends and relatives living in villages called up to encourage me. It all started with my sister uploading some of my works on her Instagram account sometime in March this year just to encourage me.

“The response was kind of overwhelming for me. My works gradually got featured in various Instagram and Pinterest stories and posts, including some accounts of foreign nationals. I started getting more orders. Since then, I have been stitching my fingers away.”

Although she has limited designs, she recently started retailing some of her works at Fusion Store in Dimapur. “Temsusenla Kichu, proprietor of Fusion Store, was kind enough to offer me a space for which I am very grateful. But mostly, people approach me for orders via Instagram or WhatsApp accounts. I upload my samples and works on Instagram and they select what to order from there,” she said.

Luruo said she works mostly on cotton fabric and does not follow any specific technique. She mainly uses the basic stitching techniques that she knows; such as split-stitch and stem-stitch. However, she said she also loves to improvise with her own unnamed styles. “The needle is handled like you would a pen or a pencil or a paint brush, for that matter. And that’s the best thing about hand embroidery; it gives you the freedom to use and follow your imagination just like any other creative art.”

According to Luruo, she gets her inspiration and technical help from various social media platforms.

‘The lady in her Naga traditional attire with a Naga basket pattern’, she says, will always hold a special place in her heart. She narrates: “My husband would often encourage me with these words, ‘create something unique, something which is not common or explored by others, something which you can claim it as your own. You know what? There is a kind of cultural revival going on amongst our people. So explore cultural themes.’ It always gives me immense pleasure to be creating and recreating this theme that symbolises my identity and creativity.”

As a mother of two young boys, it is not easy to focus on work, she confessed; adding that she schedules her time on a daily basis for each project and tries to stick to that schedule.

According to Luruo, her husband is her main motivator. “I just couldn’t have come this far without him; he is the one who has ignited my love for art; he is always there to lift my heart up even when I hit some of those emotionally low moments. He takes interest in my works and is my best art critic. He keeps pushing me to improve, or redo a mistake and never to compromise with my mistakes or limitations.”

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Healing Leadership – Need of the Hour! https://easternmirrornagaland.com/healing-leadership-need-of-the-hour/ Thu, 22 Aug 2019 18:27:17 +0000 https://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=267280 Nothing remains static is a matter of fact. Today, within the universal dynamism of history, the Naga aspirations require serious rethinking. The Forum for Naga Reconciliation (FNR) makes this public statement calling for a healing leadership and awakening of the Naga will. A Call for Rethinking The developing situation in the Indian sub-continent points to an elevated discourse on democracy and rights. Like most dominant powers the temptation to act with impunity for its own interests will be India’s greatest test. For now, the Government of India’s centralising character and intent to manufacture uniformity amidst diversity is clearly evident. By implication this new reality represents the 21st century vision and future of India. Here in the Naga Homeland it has aroused speculations, assumptions and anxiety into an already fragile context. It brings to life questions of trust, sincerity and democratic justice. What does this mean for Nagas, our lands and our historical and political rights? This calls for an honest examination of our situation. More importantly the need for rethinking how Nagas can, through peaceful means, find their rightful place in the community of nations and peoples. A Policy of Define and Rule Nagas are currently facing a new phenomenon...

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Nothing remains static is a matter of fact. Today, within the universal dynamism of history, the Naga aspirations require serious rethinking. The Forum for Naga Reconciliation (FNR) makes this public statement calling for a healing leadership and awakening of the Naga will.

A Call for Rethinking
The developing situation in the Indian sub-continent points to an elevated discourse on democracy and rights. Like most dominant powers the temptation to act with impunity for its own interests will be India’s greatest test. For now, the Government of India’s centralising character and intent to manufacture uniformity amidst diversity is clearly evident. By implication this new reality represents the 21st century vision and future of India.

Here in the Naga Homeland it has aroused speculations, assumptions and anxiety into an already fragile context. It brings to life questions of trust, sincerity and democratic justice. What does this mean for Nagas, our lands and our historical and political rights? This calls for an honest examination of our situation. More importantly the need for rethinking how Nagas can, through peaceful means, find their rightful place in the community of nations and peoples.

A Policy of Define and Rule
Nagas are currently facing a new phenomenon of define and rule. In 1960s, Nagas experienced policies of strategic and systematic divide and rule. It fractured the Naga peoplehood by dividing the Naga homeland with arbitrary boundaries and creating a new Naga polity with “special provisions.” While the divide and rule policy had devastating consequences, people still had space to protest and resist the division.

The policy of divide and rule has graduated to a more sophisticated form that employs the art to define and rule. Along with the State, this policy requires co-opted sections of the Naga population becoming active participants. FNR is deeply concerned since the Naga peoplehood is being defined very narrowly and threatens to destroy the web of relationships. We need to prevent Nagas from being pitted against Nagas. This will have far reaching consequences on future Naga generations.

The Need for a Healing Leadership
Naga people are traumatised with deep wounds caused by generations of militarisation and conflict. To survive and heal these wounds, we require sincere efforts towards reconciliation and dignity. When the Naga national groups (aka factions) signed the “Covenant of Reconciliation” a semblance of forgiveness and reconciliation took place at the group level. This was further demonstrated as factional violence reduced and de-escalated. The resulting relative peace stimulated an upbeat market economy, more freedom of movement and overall a sense of normalcy. Yet, despite these positive indicators, the Naga reconciliation process is incomplete. The personal animosity and inability to respect and accept the other continues. This has been a major deterrent to full reconciliation.

For Nagas to overcome the present challenge, healing is needed across society, one that is inspired by a transformational and healing leadership. Statesmanship with political courage is needed to transcend the animosity, self-interest and factional politics. The situation needs a Naga leadership model that is shared and inclusive, one that instils trust and optimism. The people want leaders that listen, are credible, and earn their trust. A Naga leadership model needs to be available and accessible to the people, one that is responsive and represents the people’s true aspirations.

A Dynamic India
Transformative change is true liberation. It is the conscious will to be independent yet interconnected, to choose realistic growth on a par with the rest of the world. An India that is vibrant, dynamic and democratic will respect Naga historical and political rights. We believe that democratic India and pragmatic Nagas can be liberated to go beyond boundaries of dogmatic thinking into creative and just political relationships of dignity. The vision of a peaceful co-existence is indispensable to a relationship of mutual respect.

A New Naga Spirit
The 21st century Naga needs to be far-sighted. The practice of making decisions for convenience has not proven to have our best interests at heart. We need to make decisions that are consistent with and support the well-being of all generations, of our children and their children. This Naga spirit must grow beyond our boundaries. Only in embracing others we will liberate ourselves.

In contemporary Naga Homeland we urgently need to have a public discourse on “political reconciliation” while some semblance of peace still remains. Let us focus on our shared belonging with dignity, purpose and meaning. The Naga public’s voice must be heard. Let us as Nagas move on together in critical solidarity with our neighbours – large and small.

An Appeal for Restraint
FNR is deeply saddened and concerned by the recent spurt of factional violence. The hard earned “Covenant of Reconciliation” which began the cessation of bloodshed among the Nagas must be upheld. FNR appeals to all NPGs for restraint.

FNR Commitment to Reconciliation
The FNR stands for Nagas without Borders. And today we once again publicly affirm our commitment to Naga Reconciliation without any bias or prejudice towards any faction. Towards this end, the FNR remains open and willing to facilitate a reconciliation meeting among the Naga political groups.

Issued by the
Forum for Naga Reconciliation

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Medümneo – The Festival of Yimchungrü https://easternmirrornagaland.com/medumneo-the-festival-of-yimchungru/ Wed, 07 Aug 2019 17:50:13 +0000 http://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=264596 The significance of the feast Medümneo means Me-Soul, Tüm-Wrap and Neo-Feast. It is celebrated in the month of August. Its main feast falls from 4th to 8th August and is generally celebrated on 8th August by all Yimchungrü communities. It is a festival that marks the beginning of new harvest crops of the year. Right after the beginning of millet harvest, the preparation of Medümneo festival starts. When the time comes for this festival, pigs and cows are killed for meat and millet rice-bear is prepared enough for drink in each and every household for celebration of Medümneo festival. The festival has various ritual practices. The day from which ceremony to be falls is determined by a person known as Kiuzhipuh to proclaim the day of the feast for five days ahead of the appointed day. He count like this Shito, Zhihto, Zümto, Khihresuk and Shiresuk. The first of the feast transactions are made relating to purchase of pigs, cows for meat during the feast. On the second day, firewoods, rice, vegetables, etc. are to be collected to be used during the one week long festival. The third day pig and cows are killed for meat and distributed to the...

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The significance of the feast Medümneo means Me-Soul, Tüm-Wrap and Neo-Feast.

It is celebrated in the month of August. Its main feast falls from 4th to 8th August and is generally celebrated on 8th August by all Yimchungrü communities. It is a festival that marks the beginning of new harvest crops of the year. Right after the beginning of millet harvest, the preparation of Medümneo festival starts. When the time comes for this festival, pigs and cows are killed for meat and millet rice-bear is prepared enough for drink in each and every household for celebration of Medümneo festival. The festival has various ritual practices.

The day from which ceremony to be falls is determined by a person known as Kiuzhipuh to proclaim the day of the feast for five days ahead of the appointed day. He count like this Shito, Zhihto, Zümto, Khihresuk and Shiresuk.

The first of the feast transactions are made relating to purchase of pigs, cows for meat during the feast.

On the second day, firewoods, rice, vegetables, etc. are to be collected to be used during the one week long festival.

The third day pig and cows are killed for meat and distributed to the relative and friends.

The fourth day reaches its climax with the community feast every house displays “DAB” of a tree on their right side front of their house.

The fifth day, every able-body go up to community work for construction way connecting the village with neighbour village and leading to the field. On that day huge bonfire is lighted throughout the night, the men folk use to merry making like songs, dances and exchange of greetings and gifts.

In Medümneo, for the new born babies, parents use to offer special prayer on the occasion in order to respect soul for long life. If the new born baby of the family is a boy, ceremony is performed with 6 (six) pieces of meat which means that the boy has 6 soul, and if the baby is a girl, ceremony is performed with 5 (five) pieces of meat means that girls has 5 souls according to the legend.

And also marks the respect of person those who are going to face misfortune during the year for which they pray for the departed soul.

Boys and girls will arrange their engagement during the Medümneo, and those who are already engaged will receive gifts from their lovers and boys will present necklace, bangles to girls “Müktaklak” which means a sign of engagement besides when the consent of the girl’s parents is obtained, the boy’s parents will offer some portion of meat and local rice-beer of jug to the girl’s parents.

One of the important practices during Medümneo these days is that people invites their near and dear ones. On the day, enough foods and meats are made and shared among friends and relatives and among the friends, games and sports are also part of the day long celebration in which the boys and girls and old age people too participates. The main aim of sports and games is to bring mutual understanding and love among the people.

During this festival, people pray addressing the “Arimpuh” for abundant blessings of man and woman and bountiful harvest. They pray for the children who will be leading the next generation for bravery and wisdom.

The celebration of this great festival continues for five days after which people resumes their usual works. Medümneo festival is one of the most important festival celebrated every year in all the Yimchungrü areas.

John Tochimong
President,
Yimchunger Union Kohima

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Happy Chada Nyi – Jotsoma Youth Organisation https://easternmirrornagaland.com/happy-chada-nyi-jotsoma-youth-organisation/ Wed, 07 Aug 2019 17:49:34 +0000 http://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/?p=264600 As we reach the season of “Chada Nyi”, the unique festival of cleaning roads and paths leading to fields, the Jotsoma Youth Organisation (JYO) wishes all Jotsoma villagers and neighbouring villages “Happy Chada Nyi” . This festival is celebrated by the villagers right after paddy cultivation season by cleaning the village roads as well as clearing the footpaths leading to their fields. Through this release we share the wisdom of our forefathers in choosing the timing of the festival as well as their conscious desire to keep the village clean. As we all know that by August, almost all the plants and bushes matures but are yet to flower and seed and therefore, once cut it usually do not grow again till the spring season comes and that is how the roads and footpaths remained clean and cleared of all road side plants and bushes throughout the year, a simple yet appreciable wisdom. As we celebrate Chada Nyi, the JYO regrets to see the failure of the government in maintaining the “Jotsoma Bye-Pass Road (Victory Road)” despite of the fact that every monsoon season, vehicles are diverted to the Bye Pass Road because of landslide at NH 29. This year...

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As we reach the season of “Chada Nyi”, the unique festival of cleaning roads and paths leading to fields, the Jotsoma Youth Organisation (JYO) wishes all Jotsoma villagers and neighbouring villages “Happy Chada Nyi” . This festival is celebrated by the villagers right after paddy cultivation season by cleaning the village roads as well as clearing the footpaths leading to their fields. Through this release we share the wisdom of our forefathers in choosing the timing of the festival as well as their conscious desire to keep the village clean. As we all know that by August, almost all the plants and bushes matures but are yet to flower and seed and therefore, once cut it usually do not grow again till the spring season comes and that is how the roads and footpaths remained clean and cleared of all road side plants and bushes throughout the year, a simple yet appreciable wisdom.

As we celebrate Chada Nyi, the JYO regrets to see the failure of the government in maintaining the “Jotsoma Bye-Pass Road (Victory Road)” despite of the fact that every monsoon season, vehicles are diverted to the Bye Pass Road because of landslide at NH 29. This year too, for the second time the Bye Pass is being used by the commuters traveling NH 29 to Kohima/Dimapur and beyond. It is not only the Bye-Pass Road but commuters used and are using the Village Road to reach Kohima via Science College and vice-versa. The unrepaired and unmaintained road has been causing frequent avoidable accidents and breakdown of vehicles causing untold sufferings to the travelers. It may be mentioned that the Village of Jotsoma has been repairing the Bye-Pass Road and the Village Road by filling up potholes for many years on the occasion of Chada Nyi, the festival of cleaning roads and footpaths in the interest of the general public.

This year “Chada Nyi” will be celebrated on 10th August (Saturday) and besides cleaning the footpaths leading to respective fields, the JYO shall be focusing in the repair of Village Road from “Kohima, Dimapur, Khonoma Tri-Junction” near St. Andrew’s Church Jotsoma till the Welcome Gate at “Tsieyie Dzü” stream, Science College-Kohima Road. Though this road has been a vital link road to Kohima, especially, during emergencies as is being faced at the moment, the road remained neglected and unrepaired for more than two decades. Therefore in 2014, the road was black topped by the villagers with the assurance from the Government that the entire expenditure incurred by the villagers shall be reimbursed. The villagers through their own sources mobilized Rs 1.60 Crore and on completion of the road by mid-April, 2014 submitted the bill to the Department. Sadly, successive governments failed to reimburse even a single rupee till date.

Despite of the failure to maintain or repair the roads, the Jotsoma Stone Crushers union volunteered to supply all the stone chips required for repairing the village road, the Jotsoma Truck and Excavator Owners volunteered to let their machineries carry and clear the debris on the road free of cost. Therefore, on the occasion of the “Chada Nyi”, the villagers shall repair the village road from the “Tri-Junction” near St. Andrew’s Church Jotsoma till the Welcome Gate at “Tsieyier Dzü” stream, Science College-Kohima Road. In view of the repair work to be carried out, the public are hereby notify that vehicular movement shall be closed on 10th August, 2019 from 7:00 AM till 5:00 PM on this road. However, vehicle carrying school going children and students of Kohima Science College, Jotsoma and Sazolie College are exempted during the school and college hours. In case of any other emergencies, commuters may kindly contact the JYO volunteers or the phone numbers provided below.

Further, through this release the JYO would like to inform all the travelers traveling the By-Pass Road to Kohima or Dimapur that it is the endeavour of JYO to let travelers pass through the Jotsoma area without any trouble or hardship and in this regard, commuters requiring any help, be it mechanical in case of vehicular breakdown or otherwise, travelers may kindly contact these numbers 9612161116, 9436875905, 8119962922 and 7005607282. Further, the commuters are requested not to litter the road side especially with plastic waste as the village has been endeavouring to keep the village PLASTIC FREE.

Khrieto Peseyie,President
Jotsoma Youth Organisation;

Rokozhalie Gwerie, Secretary
Jotsoma Youth Organisation

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